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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 153-155

Microleakage evaluation of class II composite restoration with incremental and bulk fill technique


1 Department of Restorative Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Maxillofacial Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Mohammed Abdul Kader
Department of Restorative Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2348-2915.176678

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Introduction: Microleakage has been regarded as a primary concern of use of composites in class II cavity restorations. Many products have attempted to minimize the interfacial gap between the tooth and restoration, the main pathway of microleakage. The aim of this in-vitro study is to quantitatively evaluate the microleakage of class II composite restoration done with incremental and bulk fill technique. Materials and Methods: In an in-vitro study, a total of 40 sound extracted molars were used for class II preparations and restoration with incremental (Group I, 20 teeth) and bulk fill technique (Group II, 20 teeth). Samples were accessed for dye penetration and pairwise comparison was done using Wilcoxon rank test. Results: Both the composite insertion techniques were not able to completely eliminate the microleakage. Two specimens of bulk filling technique show microleakage, extending to the axial wall. There is no statistically significant difference in microleakage irrespective of the insertion technique used. Conclusion: It can be concluded from the results that there is no significant difference in microleakage for composite restorations done by a bulk layering technique using the newer generation composites and the conventional incremental layering technique.


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